Graham and Holiday: Are either of these typical plus size women?

Bold Magazine has been covering plus sized models, actresses, and singers, since 2008. But, there’s an amazing revolution happening in the plus size world!

The average women is between a size 12 and 14 in the US. The average shopper actually doesn’t buy a size 14. It is the least purchased size in retail stores. But, the American public seems to be obsessed with the new plus size trend. The two women who at the helm of this frenzy are Ashley Graham, Dress Size 16, and Tess Holiday, Dress Size 22. Ashley_Graham_(model)_2014

In the coming weeks, we’ll be discussing a number of bloggers, models, and fashionistas who are all covering the plus size beat. Some have been sensationalizing it in the media. Others, even fetishizing it. But, what does the plus sized woman look like? Act like? Feel like? We seem to think that Ashley Graham and Tess Holiday have epitomized what it is to be plus for us. Why? Do other models and actress epitomize what it is to be a woman?

Do you consider yourself Plus Sized? If so, what size are you?

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As we met up with all of these ladies, we had a very important question to ask them:

Does being a plus sized woman preclude being just…. a woman?

And, we ask that same question of our readers. Does being plus define you? Does it compare to your role at your job? At home? Does it compete with your gender? Race? Religion? Other demographics? It’s important to begin asking these questions as the plus size community grows.

Amy Schumer had an interesting stance for/against the plus size community. She didn’t want to be defined as plus sized. Some say it’s because she did not want to be included in that size category. Others say that she was standing up for females who may have the wrong connotation in mind when they see her and hear the words “plus sized.”

Tess-Holliday-Bikini-HashtagBut, there is this odd unspoken (sometimes spoken) debate around that term. Plus sized… it almost creeps me out just to hear it. Why are we using that phrase so often now? Are the same women who were larger than average in 1995 now a different type of woman because they are plus sized? What is the big deal about being plus?

And, more importantly, when are we going to have more than two mass media role models to wear our clothes?

 

Author: Mary Moser

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